LIVE THE INTERESTING LIFE

DISCOVERY. EXPERIENCE. ADVENTURE.

This year, summer came on like a grudge, with the sense that life in America’s mythic frontier might never be the same. Will the West survive? Photograph by John Moore / Getty Images

This year, summer came on like a grudge, with the sense that life in America’s mythic frontier might never be the same. Will the West survive? Photograph by John Moore / Getty Images

At a time when distraught soldiers kill themselves in record numbers — 18 veterans per day — the armed forces are spending a fortune on drugs known to increase the chance of suicide. Read about the military’s billion-dollar pill problem in the December 2012/January 2013 issue of Men’s Journal, on newsstands now.

At a time when distraught soldiers kill themselves in record numbers — 18 veterans per day — the armed forces are spending a fortune on drugs known to increase the chance of suicide. Read about the military’s billion-dollar pill problem in the December 2012/January 2013 issue of Men’s Journal, on newsstands now.

Intermittent fasting is the hottest way to lose weight, gain definition, and possibly live longer. Photograph by Brad Harris

Intermittent fasting is the hottest way to lose weight, gain definition, and possibly live longer. Photograph by Brad Harris

It’s the NFL’s latest crisis: Painkillers are the only thing keeping some of today’s players on the field week after week. What happens when their careers are over — but their addictions aren’t? Paul Solotaroff has the scoop in our November issue. Photograph by Travis Rathbone.

It’s the NFL’s latest crisis: Painkillers are the only thing keeping some of today’s players on the field week after week. What happens when their careers are over — but their addictions aren’t? Paul Solotaroff has the scoop in our November issue. Photograph by Travis Rathbone.

Finally, the wait is over: HBO’s Hard Knocks is back, this time with an all-access pass to Miami Dolphins training camp. Last year, the Emmy winner was on hiatus (due to the lingering NFL lockout), so our most recent memories consist of New York Jets coach Rex Ryan’s profanity-laced speeches and Antonio Cromartie’s failed attempt to correctly name all of his nine children. This offseason, the Dolphins underwent a coaching overhaul, hiring Green Bay Packers offensive coordinator Joe Philbin as their new head coach (as well as bringing in new offensive and defensive coordinators). So, as the tides begin to change in Miami, here are the three players and storylines certain to grab our attention this summer.
Chad Johnson, WRComing off a season with the Patriots that seemed more like a disappearing act, Johnson — yes, it’s back to Johnson — has already declared 2012 will be a “monster year.” At 34, the Miami-native has vowed to resurrect the same outspoken personality last seen in Cincinnati: “When my mouth is running, it forces me to perform,” Johnson recently told the Miami Herald. The always-entertaining wide receiver is certain to be a camera magnet and, lucky for us, it already sounds like he’s shed that infamous New England straight jacket.
Reggie Bush, RBLast year, a Kardashian-free Bush had a breakout first season in Miami, eclipsing the 1,000-yard rushing plateau for the first time in his six-year career. Back in May, Bush set his sights on a new goal: “I want the rushing title,” he confidently told WSVN-TV. Surely Coach Philbin loves that confidence, but Dolphins fans should tread lightly. After all, Bush has a history of injury problems — two left knee strains led to surgery in 2008, and a broken right leg kept him on the sidelines in 2010. Plus, he’ll be forced to share the ball this season with Daniel Thomas, who rushed for nearly 600 yards as a rookie last year. Nonetheless, it’ll be interesting to see if Bush can make the final push towards superstardom.
Ryan Tannehill, QBThe No. 8 overall pick in this year’s draft is widely regarded as Miami’s quarterback of the future. Tannehill’s versatility and athleticism allowed him to excel as a wide receiver at Texas A&M before taking over as the signal caller during his redshirt junior season. And while his metamorphosis into a professional quarterback is ongoing, the experience and understanding he has of the receiver position puts him in a unique situation: A strong camp from Tannehill, combined with frequent struggles from veterans Matt Moore and David Garrard, could force Philbin’s hand. If that’s the case, Miami fans may get a look at their future earlier than originally anticipated. —Dan Brennan. Photograph by Joel Auerbach / Getty Images

Finally, the wait is over: HBO’s Hard Knocks is back, this time with an all-access pass to Miami Dolphins training camp. Last year, the Emmy winner was on hiatus (due to the lingering NFL lockout), so our most recent memories consist of New York Jets coach Rex Ryan’s profanity-laced speeches and Antonio Cromartie’s failed attempt to correctly name all of his nine children. This offseason, the Dolphins underwent a coaching overhaul, hiring Green Bay Packers offensive coordinator Joe Philbin as their new head coach (as well as bringing in new offensive and defensive coordinators). So, as the tides begin to change in Miami, here are the three players and storylines certain to grab our attention this summer.

Chad Johnson, WR
Coming off a season with the Patriots that seemed more like a disappearing act, Johnson — yes, it’s back to Johnson — has already declared 2012 will be a “monster year.” At 34, the Miami-native has vowed to resurrect the same outspoken personality last seen in Cincinnati: “When my mouth is running, it forces me to perform,” Johnson recently told the Miami Herald. The always-entertaining wide receiver is certain to be a camera magnet and, lucky for us, it already sounds like he’s shed that infamous New England straight jacket.

Reggie Bush, RB
Last year, a Kardashian-free Bush had a breakout first season in Miami, eclipsing the 1,000-yard rushing plateau for the first time in his six-year career. Back in May, Bush set his sights on a new goal: “I want the rushing title,” he confidently told WSVN-TV. Surely Coach Philbin loves that confidence, but Dolphins fans should tread lightly. After all, Bush has a history of injury problems — two left knee strains led to surgery in 2008, and a broken right leg kept him on the sidelines in 2010. Plus, he’ll be forced to share the ball this season with Daniel Thomas, who rushed for nearly 600 yards as a rookie last year. Nonetheless, it’ll be interesting to see if Bush can make the final push towards superstardom.

Ryan Tannehill, QB
The No. 8 overall pick in this year’s draft is widely regarded as Miami’s quarterback of the future. Tannehill’s versatility and athleticism allowed him to excel as a wide receiver at Texas A&M before taking over as the signal caller during his redshirt junior season. And while his metamorphosis into a professional quarterback is ongoing, the experience and understanding he has of the receiver position puts him in a unique situation: A strong camp from Tannehill, combined with frequent struggles from veterans Matt Moore and David Garrard, could force Philbin’s hand. If that’s the case, Miami fans may get a look at their future earlier than originally anticipated. —Dan Brennan. Photograph by Joel Auerbach / Getty Images

Coach Krzyzewski — Far be it from us to tell a man how to do his job (let alone one with an Olympic gold meal and four NCAA titles) but hell, we’ll give it a shot. After all, it’s the day before the Fourth of July and everyone’s already gone. After reviewing your shortlisted roster for the USA Olympic Basketball team, we have two suggestions for you and your staff.


Tap Anthony Davis over Blake GriffinFrontcourt depth remains a dilemma, and we believe the 6’10” Davis is the answer to troubles. Sure, Davis is raw on the offensive end of the court, but playing him alongside Kevin Love will give you two players that can hit the boards well and get the ball down court in transition. Griffin, your second option, is the epitome of flash over substance. Sure, his dunks make SportCenter’s Top 10, but the postseason, Griffin’s rebounding totals sunk from 10.9 to 6.9 per game on average. And while Griffin brings an established chemistry with teammate Chris Paul to the table, that doesn’t make up for what he gives up defensively.Give Russell Westbrook serious minutes and he’ll become an integral member of the team
At various points in the 2008 Games, you wisely played Chris Paul and Deron Williams in a dual point-guard set, allowing Williams to move without the ball and step into better looks. But playing Westbrook instead of Williams will deliver an even greater result. Sure, Westbrook’s perimeter game isn’t as deadly, but his unequaled quickness makes him nearly impossible to guard. Plus, his mid-range game has improved dramatically since the 2010 World Championships, and his almost supernatural ability to finish around multiple defenders is impossible to ignore. Play Westbrook off the ball and he could be your ace in the hole off the bench.We hope this letter finds you well, Mike. We’ll be keeping an eye out, and the remote control ready (because only the finest open letters conclude with a Shawshank reference). —Dan Brennan. Photograph by Streeter Lecka / Getty Images

Coach Krzyzewski — Far be it from us to tell a man how to do his job (let alone one with an Olympic gold meal and four NCAA titles) but hell, we’ll give it a shot. After all, it’s the day before the Fourth of July and everyone’s already gone. After reviewing your shortlisted roster for the USA Olympic Basketball team, we have two suggestions for you and your staff.



Tap Anthony Davis over Blake Griffin
Frontcourt depth remains a dilemma, and we believe the 6’10” Davis is the answer to troubles. Sure, Davis is raw on the offensive end of the court, but playing him alongside Kevin Love will give you two players that can hit the boards well and get the ball down court in transition. Griffin, your second option, is the epitome of flash over substance. Sure, his dunks make SportCenter’s Top 10, but the postseason, Griffin’s rebounding totals sunk from 10.9 to 6.9 per game on average. And while Griffin brings an established chemistry with teammate Chris Paul to the table, that doesn’t make up for what he gives up defensively.

Give Russell Westbrook serious minutes and he’ll become an integral member of the team

At various points in the 2008 Games, you wisely played Chris Paul and Deron Williams in a dual point-guard set, allowing Williams to move without the ball and step into better looks. But playing Westbrook instead of Williams will deliver an even greater result. Sure, Westbrook’s perimeter game isn’t as deadly, but his unequaled quickness makes him nearly impossible to guard. Plus, his mid-range game has improved dramatically since the 2010 World Championships, and his almost supernatural ability to finish around multiple defenders is impossible to ignore. Play Westbrook off the ball and he could be your ace in the hole off the bench.

We hope this letter finds you well, Mike. We’ll be keeping an eye out, and the remote control ready (because only the finest open letters conclude with a Shawshank reference). —Dan Brennan. Photograph by Streeter Lecka / Getty Images

Microsoft’s Would-Be iPhone — Circa 1991
In our May 2012 issue, contributing editor Joe Hagan profiled Microsoft veteran Nathan Myhrvold, who retired in 1999 after serving 14-years as Bill Gates’ personal tech visionary.  Since leaving Microsoft, Myhrvold has lived a nerd fantasy, digging up T. rexes and producing a cookbook only a mad scientist could love.
During his years at the computing giant’s Redmond, Washington headquarters, Myhrvold described in precise terms what the future of computing would look like. More often that not, he was pretty damned accurate: In 1991, while serving as the company’s chief visionary, Myhrvold predicted the emergence of an iPhone-like device down to the smallest detail, describing a “digital wallet” that would consolidate personal communication — telephone, schedule manager, notepad, contacts, and a library of music and books — all in one.
Rarely seen outside of Myhrvold’s inner circle, this sketch of Microsoft’s would-be iPhone portrayed a gadget that could record and archive everything you asked it to, he surmised. “The cost will not be very high,” wrote Myhrvold. “It is pretty easy to imagine a $400 to $1,000 retail price.” Microsoft, however, was too cost conscious and risk averse to execute his vision. “Hey, it was better than predicting the wrong thing,” Myhrvold says now.
For more information about Myhrvold, his tenure at Microsoft, and his newfound passion for molecular gastronomy, read Joe Hagan’s “How a Geek Grills a Burger” here.

Microsoft’s Would-Be iPhone — Circa 1991

In our May 2012 issue, contributing editor Joe Hagan profiled Microsoft veteran Nathan Myhrvold, who retired in 1999 after serving 14-years as Bill Gates’ personal tech visionary.  Since leaving Microsoft, Myhrvold has lived a nerd fantasy, digging up T. rexes and producing a cookbook only a mad scientist could love.

During his years at the computing giant’s Redmond, Washington headquarters, Myhrvold described in precise terms what the future of computing would look like. More often that not, he was pretty damned accurate: In 1991, while serving as the company’s chief visionary, Myhrvold predicted the emergence of an iPhone-like device down to the smallest detail, describing a “digital wallet” that would consolidate personal communication — telephone, schedule manager, notepad, contacts, and a library of music and books — all in one.

Rarely seen outside of Myhrvold’s inner circle, this sketch of Microsoft’s would-be iPhone portrayed a gadget that could record and archive everything you asked it to, he surmised. “The cost will not be very high,” wrote Myhrvold. “It is pretty easy to imagine a $400 to $1,000 retail price.” Microsoft, however, was too cost conscious and risk averse to execute his vision. “Hey, it was better than predicting the wrong thing,” Myhrvold says now.

For more information about Myhrvold, his tenure at Microsoft, and his newfound passion for molecular gastronomy, read Joe Hagan’s “How a Geek Grills a Burger” here.